Home
The Jam?son Network digest is a series of essays and articles about anything Jam?son. We invite and encourage you to add your comments to any of these.


The journey from the north of Ireland to New England in 1718 was not by any means the first migration of people from Ireland to America, but it is probably the first that was organized to bring groups of settlers from one definite catchment area, and importantly, these were people who wanted to continue to live together in the new land, which is an aspect of the whole thing that makes it particularly interesting for us as family historians.

So, with the opportunity to catch public attention as we approach the tercentenary next year. People on both sides of the Atlantic are organising exciting events and projects. There will be re-enactments, television documentaries, a book of essays and more. Ideally we would hope to bring people together, either virtually to discuss ancestry, or in reality, to experience the places that our ancestors and forebears left from or went to.   Read more...
There have long been speculations, references and rumors, that the legendary "Flying Wallenda" family is somehow related with the well known Irish Whiskey Jameson family. These traditions appear to have been put forward by members from both of these families at different times over the years.   Read more...
Vietnam veteran Charles Clifton Jameson served his country honorably like the ancestors who came before him, including his third great grandfather Col. David Jameson, flag bearer for the original Culpeper Minutemen who marched to fight the British during the American Revolution.   Read more...
It's not just at your local tavern or pub where both Jamesons and Guinnesses have come together, but also in marriage, such as at St. George's Church in Dublin in 1844, when William Jameson, grandson of John Jameson, founder of the Irish Whiskey company that bears his name, married Elizabeth Guinness, granddaughter of Arthur Guinness, the founder of the Guinness brewing dynasty, which also began in the mid-1700s.   Read more...
Not all Jamesons (regardless of any spelling variations) are actually related to each other, at least not by blood lineage. We know this to be fact, not just because we are too often unable to connect each other by traditional methods, but because modern genetic testing proves this without any question or doubt   Read more...
The ancestors of James Jameson, who died in Essex County, Virginia, in 1736, have long been the subject of considerable confusion and much debate. Here is a more recent analysis of this, and other early Virginia James families of that time and area.   Read more...
There is, amongst some, a long standing Jameson family tradition that claims it's lineage directly back to King James 1st, of Scotland, and his mistress Janet Gunn - through their two illegitimate sons who held the name....   Read more...

- please contact us regarding any broken links - or - to learn more about submitting your own essay or article-


Copyright 2015-2017. The Jameson Network.© All Rights Reserved.
The contents of this site are a collection of information from a multitude of sources, the integrity of which cannot always be proven or guaranteed, both as to accuracy and completeness. Therefore, the owners and participants of The Jameson Network assume no responsibility for the information available on this site. We can however say our intentions are to be as accurate and complete as possible, given the perpetual unfinished nature of any genealogy and family history.